May Updates

(1) From 7-9th May, Slava Kungurtsev from the Czech Technical University in Prague is visiting me. During his stay, he is presenting a seminar:

Title: Optimization Algorithms for Solving Problems Arising from Large Scale Machine Learning

Abstract: In the contemporary “big data” age, the use of Machine Learning models for analyzing large volumes of data has been instrumental in a lot of current technological development. These models necessitate solving very large scale optimization problems, presenting challenges in terms of developing appropriate solvers. In addition, especially for problems arising from Deep Neural Network architectures, the resulting problems are often nonconvex, and sometimes nonsmooth, giving additional difficulty.

In this talk I present the standard structural elements of this class of problems, and how these structures can be handled with appropriate parallel architectures. I discuss the state of the art in terms of optimization algorithms for this setting and summarize the prognosis for ongoing and future research.

Date: 7th May 2018, 14h00 in TDC.

(2) From 20-24th May, the IEEE International Conference on Communications will be held in Kansas City, USA. Our paper on chemical dynamics for molecular communications will appear in the Symposium on Molecular, Biological and Multi-Scale Communications:

Malcolm Egan, Trang C. Mai, Trung Q. Duong and Marco Di Renzo, “Coordination via advection dynamics in nano networks with molecular communication”, accepted for publication in IEEE International Conference on Communications (ICC), (2018).

The preprint is available here.

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April Updates

(1) Since the 19th March until the end of the month, I am visiting in Prof. Vincent Poor’s group in the Department of Electrical Engineering in Princeton University.

(2) On the 11th April at 3:30pm, I will present a seminar in New York University in the NYU Wireless group. Here are the details:

Title – The Information Capacity Map: Perspectives from Sensitivity Analysis

Abstract – The Shannon capacity for scalar, stationary and memoryless point-to-point channels is a fundamental concept in information theory. However for continuous non-Gaussian channels, there are no closed-form characterizations in most cases. A key question is therefore how to understand the impact of model parameters on the Shannon capacity. In this talk, I will introduce the notion of capacity sensitivity and its analysis. The analysis relies on three lemmas drawn from non-smooth optimization theory in general metric spaces and provides new insights into the impact of variations in the input constraints and the noise distribution. This talk will highlight three aspects: the generality of the methods (beyond additive absolutely continuous noise models); insights into the structure of the optimal input distribution; and on-going work into generalizations of capacity sensitivity for multi-user channels.

(3) Between the 4th-6th April, the 3rd Workshop on Molecular Communications was held in Ghent, Belgium. Unfortunately, due to the current strikes by the train service SNCF, we were unable to present our paper. Nevertheless, it can be found on HAL:

Malcolm Egan, Trung Q. Duong, Marco Di Renzo, Jean-Marie Gorce, Ido Nevat and Valeria Loscri, “Cognitive molecular communication (technical abstract),” accepted for publication in the 3rd Workshop on Molecular Communications, (2018).

The preprint for the paper can be found here.

March Updates

(1) Between 19th March and 28th April I am visiting Prof. H. Vincent Poor’s group in the Department of Electrical Engineering in Princeton University.

(2) On I presented a seminar in Prof. Poor’s group. Details are below:

Title – Capacity Sensitivity: Three Lemmas and Their Application

Abstract – The Shannon capacity for scalar, stationary and memoryless point-to-point channels is a fundamental concept in information theory. However for continuous non-Gaussian channels, there are no closed-form characterizations in most cases. A key question is therefore how to understand the impact of model parameters on the Shannon capacity. In this talk, I will introduce the notion of capacity sensitivity and its analysis. The analysis relies on three lemmas drawn from non-smooth optimization theory in general metric spaces and provides new insights into the impact of variations in the input constraints and the noise distribution. This talk will highlight three aspects: the generality of the methods (beyond additive absolutely continuous noise models); insights into the structure of the optimal input distribution; and on-going work into generalizations of capacity sensitivity for multi-user channels.

(2) From 21-23 March I attended the 52nd Annual Conference on Information Sciences and Systems (CISS) 2018 in Princeton and presented joint work with Samir Perlaza on our most recent results characterizing capacity sensitivity:

Malcolm Egan and Samir M. Perlaza, “Capacity approximation of continuous channels by discrete inputs”, in Proc. CISS 2018 (Invited Paper)

(3) My extended abstract with Trung Duong, Marco Di Renzo, Jean-Marie Gorce, Ido Nevat and Valeria Loscri has been accepted in the 3rd Workshop on Molecular Communications:

Malcolm Egan, Trung Q. Duong, Marco Di Renzo, Jean-Marie Gorce, Ido Nevat and Valeria Loscri, “Cognitive molecular communication (technical abstract),” accepted for publication in the 3rd Workshop on Molecular Communications, (2018).

(4) My paper on mechanism design for on-demand transport with Jan Drchal, Jan Mrkos and Michal Jakob has been accepted in EAI Transactions on Industrial Networks and Intelligent Systems:

Malcolm Egan, Jan Drchal, Jan Mrkos and Michal Jakob, “Towards data-driven on-demand transport”, accepted for publication in EAI Transactions on Industrial Networks and Intelligent Systems.

 

July Updates

(1) With Andrea Tassi, Rob Piechocki and Andy Nix, I have a new paper accepted in IEEE Transactions on Vehicular Technology:

Andrea Tassi, Malcolm Egan, Robert J. Piechocki and Andrew Nix, “Modelling and Design of Millimeter-Wave Networks for Highway Vehicular Communication”, accepted for publication in IEEE Transactions on Vehicular Technology.

Check it out on arXiv here.

(2) With Laurent Clavier, Mauro de Freitas, Louis Dorville and Jean-Marie Gorce, I have a new paper accepted in IEEE GLOBECOM 2017:

Malcolm Egan, Laurent Clavier, Mauro de Freitas, Louis Dorville, Jean-Marie Gorce and Anne Savard, “Wireless communication in dynamic interference”, accepted in IEEE GLOBECOM 2017.

This work applies our previous information theoretic results on additive alpha-stable noise channels to large-scale wireless networks to support the Internet of Things.

AIS Seminar at Kings College London 24/2/15

I’m in London at the moment, visiting Gareth Peters at UCL to think about alpha-stable random variables and their applications. Tomorrow, I’m also presenting in the Agents and Intelligent Systems Seminar at Kings College London (see the link for location and time). The details are:

Title: From Taxis to Uber: Market Design for On-Demand Transport Services

Abstract: Uber is one of several recent companies adopting a business model that lies in stark contrast with the standard approach used by taxi services–evidenced by the highly publicized legal difficulties. Underlying Uber’s business model is a new architecture, which governs how commuters, drivers, and the company interact with each other. In order to understand key properties of this new architecture, we introduce an agent-based model and propose a market mechanism that routes, schedules, and prices commuters, while also selecting and paying drivers. We analyze the mechanism and demonstrate the effect of varying passenger types and side information available to the company affects the profitability of the service. We then compare the performance of our approach with a mechanism based on the standard taxi architecture via simulations using realistic demand and location data from Prague, Czech Republic.

ATG Seminar 18/2/15

Next Wednesday I will be presenting a seminar in the Agent Technology Center Seminar Series.

Title: Pass Go and Collect $200: The Profitable Union of Facilities and Small-Cells

Room: E-205, Department of Computer Science, CVUT (this is located at Karlovo Namesti, see http://cs.felk.cvut.cz/)

When: Wed, 18th Feb, 14:30

Abstract: Wireless cellular communication networks are undergoing a major shift: from traditional macrocell based architectures to small-cells. A key consequence of this shift is that there is potential for facilities (such as universities, mines and power plants) to own and operate their own wireless cellular networks. In this talk, I will argue that there are good economic reasons to do this, and propose leasing and service agreements to support these facility micronetworks. I will then introduce an evaluation framework based on ruin theory, where the key metric is the probability of ruin; i.e., the probability that the net profit drops below zero. I will also present new results and a methodology for evaluating the probability of ruin in this setting, which paves the way towards a business case for facility micronetworks and an understanding of how wireless network and financial considerations interact.